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Design

Architect Tetsuo Kondo designed ‘A Path in the Forest’, a temporary installation that was found in the Kadriorg Park near Tallinn, Estonia. Kondo created a 95-meter (311-foot) walkway suspended among some of the park’s 300 year-old trees.

 

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We have a very exciting urban garden in the making and this sculptural fire from Glamm Fire will be the cherry on the cake.
Stunning in design, beautifully finished and exquisitely detailed in Corten steel, the fire also uses Bioethanol, which is 100% green.

We cannot wait to see this in place.

www.glammfire.com

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The Illumin Philo Pendant Light by Dyberg Larsen is made from layers of angular polypropylene leaves, in colour, it gives off a lovely glow and would make a stunning centrepiece in any home. Bring the green in we say.

Available from Limelace for £89.00, 

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I have been lucky enough to experience Rebecca Louise Law’s wonderful floral artworks at The Chelsea Flower show. She hangs flowers from copper wires on the ceiling of a tunnel making a suspended garden above visitors heads, they are simply enchanting all who walk under them.

Here are a few images of pieces from her website. They really are quite spectacular and I seriously covet the display glasses filled with masses of floral fodder.

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Wondering down a mown pathway, with the dappled shade from many trees dancing on either side, I gaze ahead to see the reflections on a lake drawing me on.

I breathe in and turn right and step into a grove of wild cherry, Prunus avium, planted in a large square formation grid. The design, so regimented amongst the naturalistic planting, gives this grove so much sense of place. All around me tall pale tree trunks reach up to the sky, they look like pillars. The canopies above flutter and play with the light. It feels powerful and emotive, I am standing in natures church, happily worshipping its beauty.

I have been visiting Bryan’s ground for four years, each year I am delighted by its design and amazed at how quickly the garden is maturing in the rich loam of Herefordshire.

The house, owned by David Wheeler and Simon Dorrell, lies near Presteigne on the border between England and Wales and was built between 1911 and 1913. The gardens are home to 20 garden rooms, a rose garden, topiary, box pareterres, follies, long hedges, a ha-ha, a potager, a lake, a river and a thriving arboretum with long mown paths. It is a dream come true garden.

The planting is wonderful, sometimes colour themed, often very formal, at times very wild.

At the entrance, by the house, beautiful fruit trees line the scallop edged canal, they are underplanted with squares of 4ft-high Iris sibirica. If you come between mid May and early June you are greeted by thousands of these mass planted Iris in dazzling blue full bloom.

Full of anticipation, one flows from one garden room to the next, drawn on by the next peek of an urn, a gap in the hedges, or a jaunty building. It never disappoints, there is something special round every corner and down every path. The carefully curated vistas anchor the garden to the surrounding landscape and make you stop, gaze and wonder how you might be able to make it so you could stay here forever.

 

Bryan’s Ground, Stapleton (Nr Presteigne), Herefordshire (01544 260001;www.bryansground.co.uk). It will open again next spring to the public.

David Wheeler and Simon Dorrell are editors of Hortus magazine, a collection of essays and notes on horticulture. http://www.hortus.co.uk/

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The grid, Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

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Mown pathways, Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

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The canal, Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

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The house at Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

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The wonderful planting, Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

 

For this Kew garden, which overlooks the River Thames, we designed some lovely powder coated steel planters in dove grey, which work on two levels. These were filled with large Buxus balls and grasses.

The bins are now contained in a bespoke bin store, the front bed was planted with new green and purple planting and the window boxes with smart clipped Buxus balls.

 

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Sculpture can be so important in an outdoor space; it creates focus, intensifies the sense of place and relates to the vegetation, light and the seasonality of a garden.

We also love it when sculptures are used as physical punctuation; at the end of a long view, they become a full stop, or a comma as they lead onto another space or another sculpture.

We love the work of Charlotte Mayer, a Goldsmiths graduate. One of her pieces ‘The Thornflower’ commemorates the death of her grandmother in Treblinka at the hands of the Nazis, but at the same time represents the hope of reconciliation. Her work has wonderful movement and would enchant and enhance the right space.

More information on Charlotte can be found on The Garden Gallery’s website, amongst many other talented artists.

The Thornflower

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