The Illumin Philo Pendant Light by Dyberg Larsen is made from layers of angular polypropylene leaves, in colour, it gives off a lovely glow and would make a stunning centrepiece in any home. Bring the green in we say.

Available from Limelace for £89.00, 

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Maybe its the hippy in me, or perhaps its my lifelong love of fluro but this to me is a perfect piece of land art (…can it be land art if its painted fluro??). Visible across the desert from Las Vegas, Nevada, and standing at a height of thirty to thirty five foot, are seven large scale totems built from balanced, painted, locally-sourced boulders.

Created by renowned Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone’s public artwork Seven Magic Mountains is an exhibition that will run for two years. This work sits actually and symbolically mid way between the natural and the artificial, between the mountains and the buzz of Las Vegas.

I only once planned to go to Las Vegas, with the crackpot idea that I would marry one of my best friends. Silly, of course, and thankfully we thought better of it in the cold light of day, however perhaps I could take the very same friend to visit this glorious work of art.

Or, perhaps there is a client brave enough, who would let me take this as inspiration for an stand out garden sculpture… come on client, show yourself!

Images from the Seven Magic Mountains website. These artworks were sponsored by The Nevada Museum of Art  and The Art Production Fund.

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I have been lucky enough to experience Rebecca Louise Law’s wonderful floral artworks at The Chelsea Flower show. She hangs flowers from copper wires on the ceiling of a tunnel making a suspended garden above visitors heads, they are simply enchanting all who walk under them.

Here are a few images of pieces from her website. They really are quite spectacular and I seriously covet the display glasses filled with masses of floral fodder.

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Better known for his fashion and still life photography, Phillippe Jarrigeon fell in love with the gardens at Château de Marqueyssac whilst location scouting and captured these enchanting images for Pin Up magazine.

Insanely surreal and appealing to the child, adult and mad hatter in all of us.

philippejarrigeon.com

pinupmagazine.org

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Wondering down a mown pathway, with the dappled shade from many trees dancing on either side, I gaze ahead to see the reflections on a lake drawing me on.

I breathe in and turn right and step into a grove of wild cherry, Prunus avium, planted in a large square formation grid. The design, so regimented amongst the naturalistic planting, gives this grove so much sense of place. All around me tall pale tree trunks reach up to the sky, they look like pillars. The canopies above flutter and play with the light. It feels powerful and emotive, I am standing in natures church, happily worshipping its beauty.

I have been visiting Bryan’s ground for four years, each year I am delighted by its design and amazed at how quickly the garden is maturing in the rich loam of Herefordshire.

The house, owned by David Wheeler and Simon Dorrell, lies near Presteigne on the border between England and Wales and was built between 1911 and 1913. The gardens are home to 20 garden rooms, a rose garden, topiary, box pareterres, follies, long hedges, a ha-ha, a potager, a lake, a river and a thriving arboretum with long mown paths. It is a dream come true garden.

The planting is wonderful, sometimes colour themed, often very formal, at times very wild.

At the entrance, by the house, beautiful fruit trees line the scallop edged canal, they are underplanted with squares of 4ft-high Iris sibirica. If you come between mid May and early June you are greeted by thousands of these mass planted Iris in dazzling blue full bloom.

Full of anticipation, one flows from one garden room to the next, drawn on by the next peek of an urn, a gap in the hedges, or a jaunty building. It never disappoints, there is something special round every corner and down every path. The carefully curated vistas anchor the garden to the surrounding landscape and make you stop, gaze and wonder how you might be able to make it so you could stay here forever.

 

Bryan’s Ground, Stapleton (Nr Presteigne), Herefordshire (01544 260001;www.bryansground.co.uk). It will open again next spring to the public.

David Wheeler and Simon Dorrell are editors of Hortus magazine, a collection of essays and notes on horticulture. http://www.hortus.co.uk/

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The grid, Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

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Mown pathways, Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

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The canal, Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

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The house at Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

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The wonderful planting, Bryan’s Ground © Cat Howard

 

If you happen to be in the Alps from 14 July to 30 September 2016, Hauser & Wirth presents an exhibition of outdoor sculptures by Alexander Calder.

Calder made these sculptures on a monumental scale, it is therefore quite fitting that they be exhibited in Gstaad’s stunning mountainous surroundings. We particularly love the angular grey beasts for their strong shadows and industrial feel.

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Jon Etter, © 2016 Calder Foundation

Photographs by Jon Etter, © 2016 Calder Foundation

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